Publications

By Yan-Ying Chen (Clear Search)

2017
Publication Details
  • British Machine Vision Conference (BMVC) 2017
  • Sep 4, 2017

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Video summarization and video captioning are considered two separate tasks in existing studies. For longer videos, automatically identifying the important parts of video content and annotating them with captions will enable a richer and more concise condensation of the video. We propose a general neural network architecture that jointly considers two supervisory signals (i.e., an image-based video summary and text-based video captions) in the training phase and generates both a video summary and corresponding captions for a given video in the test phase. Our main idea is that the summary signals can help a video captioning model learn to focus on important frames. On the other hand, caption signals can help a video summarization model to learn better semantic representations. Jointly modeling both the video summarization and the video captioning tasks offers a novel end-to-end solution that generates a captioned video summary enabling users to index and navigate through the highlights in a video. Moreover, our experiments show the joint model can achieve better performance than state-of- the-art approaches in both individual tasks.

Image-Based User Profiling of Frequent and Regular Venue Categories

Publication Details
  • IEEE ICME 2017
  • Jul 10, 2017

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The availability of mobile access has shifted social media use. With that phenomenon, what users shared on social media and where they visited is naturally an excellent resource to learn their visiting behavior. Knowing visit behaviors would help market survey and customer relationship management, e.g., sending customers coupons of the businesses that they visit frequently. Most prior studies leverage meta-data e.g., check- in locations to profile visiting behavior but neglect important information from user-contributed content, e.g., images. This work addresses a novel use of image content for predicting the user visit behavior, i.e., the frequent and regular business venue categories that the content owner would visit. To collect training data, we propose a strategy to use geo-metadata associated with images for deriving the labels of an image owner’s visit behavior. Moreover, we model a user’s sequential images by using an end-to-end learning framework to reduce the optimization loss. That helps improve the prediction accuracy against the baseline as demonstrated in our experiments. The prediction is completely based on image content that is more available in social media than geo-metadata, and thus allows coverage in profiling a wider set of users.

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Users often use social media to share their interest in products. We propose to identify purchase stages from Twitter data following the AIDA model (Awareness, Interest, Desire, Action). In particular, we define a task of classifying the purchase stage of each tweet in a user's tweet sequence. We introduce RCRNN, a Ranking Convolutional Recurrent Neural Network which computes tweet representations using convolution over word embeddings and models a tweet sequence with gated recurrent units. Also, we consider various methods to cope with the imbalanced label distribution in our data and show that a ranking layer outperforms class weights.
2016
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  • CBRecSys: Workshop on New Trends in Content-Based Recommender Systems at ACM Recommender Systems Conference
  • Sep 2, 2016

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The abundance of data posted to Twitter enables companies to extract useful information, such as Twitter users who are dissatisfied with a product. We endeavor to determine which Twitter users are potential customers for companies and would be receptive to product recommendations through the language they use in tweets after mentioning a product of interest. With Twitter's API, we collected tweets from users who tweeted about mobile devices or cameras. An expert annotator determined whether each tweet was relevant to customer purchase behavior and whether a user, based on their tweets, eventually bought the product. For the relevance task, among four models, a feed-forward neural network yielded the best cross-validation accuracy of over 80% per product. For customer purchase prediction of a product, we observed improved performance with the use of sequential input of tweets to recurrent models, with an LSTM model being best; we also observed the use of relevance predictions in our model to be more effective with less powerful RNNs and on more difficult tasks.
Publication Details
  • ICME 2016
  • Jul 11, 2016

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Captions are a central component in image posts that communicate the background story behind photos. Captions can enhance the engagement with audiences and are therefore critical to campaigns or advertisement. Previous studies in image captioning either rely solely on image content or summarize multiple web documents related to image's location; both neglect users' activities. We propose business-aware latent topics as a new contextual cue for image captioning that represent user activities. The idea is to learn the typical activities of people who posted images from business venues with similar categories (e.g., fast food restaurants) to provide appropriate context for similar topics (e.g., burger) in new posts. User activities are modeled via a latent topic representation. In turn, the image captioning model can generate sentences that better reflect user activities at business venues. In our experiments, the business-aware latent topics are effective for adapting to captions to images captured in various businesses than the existing baselines. Moreover, they complement other contextual cues (image, time) in a multi-modal framework.
Publication Details
  • LREC 2016
  • May 23, 2016

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Many people post about their daily life on social media. These posts may include information about the purchase activity of people, and insights useful to companies can be derived from them: e.g. profile information of a user who mentioned something about their product. As a further advanced analysis, we consider extracting users who are likely to buy a product from the set of users who mentioned that the product is attractive. In this paper, we report our methodology for building a corpus for Twitter user purchase behavior prediction. First, we collected Twitter users who posted a want phrase + product name: e.g. "want a Xperia" as candidate want users, and also candidate bought users in the same way. Then, we asked an annotator to judge whether a candidate user actually bought a product. We also annotated whether tweets randomly sampled from want/bought user timelines are relevant or not to purchase. In this annotation, 58% of want user tweets and 35% of bought user tweets were annotated as relevant. Our data indicate that information embedded in timeline tweets can be used to predict purchase behavior of tweeted products.
Publication Details
  • AAAI
  • Feb 12, 2016

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Image localization is important for marketing and recommendation of local business; however, the level of granularity is still a critical issue. Given a consumer photo and its rough GPS information, we are interested in extracting the fine-grained location information (i.e. business venues) of the image. To this end, we propose a novel framework for business venue recognition. The framework mainly contains three parts. First, business aware visual concept discovery: we mine a set of concepts that are useful for business venue recognition based on three guidelines including business-awareness, visually detectable, and discriminative power. Second, business-aware concept detection by convolutional neural networks (BA-CNN): we pro- pose a new network architecture that can extract semantic concept features from input image. Third, multimodal business venue recognition: we extend visually detected concepts to multimodal feature representations that allow a test image to be associated with business reviews and images from social media for business venue recognition. The experiments results show the visual concepts detected by BA-CNN can achieve up to 22.5% relative improvement for business venue recognition compared to the state-of-the-art convolutional neural network features. Experiments also show that by leveraging multimodal information from social media we can further boost the performance, especially in the case when the database images belonging to each business venue are scarce.
2015
Publication Details
  • MM Commons Workshop co-located with ACM Multimedia 2015.
  • Oct 30, 2015

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In this paper, we analyze the association between a social media user's photo content and their interests. Visual content of photos is analyzed using state-of-the-art deep learning based automatic concept recognition. An aggregate visual concept signature is thereby computed for each user. User tags manually applied to their photos are also used to construct a tf-idf based signature per user. We also obtain social groups that users join to represent their social interests. In an effort to compare the visual-based versus tag-based user profiles with social interests, we compare corresponding similarity matrices with a reference similarity matrix based on users' group memberships. A random baseline is also included that groups users by random sampling while preserving the actual group sizes. A difference metric is proposed and it is shown that the combination of visual and text features better approximates the group-based similarity matrix than either modality individually. We also validate the visual analysis against the reference inter-user similarity using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Finally we cluster users by their visual signatures and rank clusters using a cluster uniqueness criteria.

Assistive Image Comment Robot - A Novel Mid-Level Concept-Based Representation

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  • IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing
  • Aug 30, 2015

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We present a general framework and working system for predicting likely affective responses of the viewers in the social media environment after an image is posted online. Our approach emphasizes a mid-level concept representation, in which intended affects of the image publisher is characterized by a large pool of visual concepts (termed PACs) detected from image content directly instead of textual metadata, evoked viewer affects are represented by concepts (termed VACs) mined from online comments, and statistical methods are used to model the correlations among these two types of concepts. We demonstrate the utilities of such approaches by developing an end-to-end Assistive Comment Robot application, which further includes components for multi-sentence comment generation, interactive interfaces, and relevance feedback functions. Through user studies, we showed machine suggested comments were accepted by users for online posting in 90% of completed user sessions, while very favorable results were also observed in various dimensions (plausibility, preference, and realism) when assessing the quality of the generated image comments.
Publication Details
  • The Twenty-Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-15)
  • Jan 25, 2015

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Name of an identity is strongly influenced by his/her cultural background such as gender and ethnicity, both vital attributes for user profiling, attribute-based retrieval, etc. Typically, the associations between names and attributes (e.g., people named "Amy" are mostly females) are annotated manually or provided by the census data of governments. We propose to associate a name and its likely demographic attributes by exploiting click-throughs between name queries and images with automatically detected facial attributes. This is the first work attempting to translate an abstract name to demographic attributes in visual-data-driven manner, and it is adaptive to incremental data, more countries and even unseen names (the names out of click-through data) without additional manual labels. In the experiments, the automatic name-attribute associations can help gender inference with competitive accuracy by using manual labeling. It also benefits profiling social media users and keyword-based face image retrieval, especially for contributing 12% relative improvement of accuracy in adapting to unseen names.