Publications

FXPAL publishes in top scientific conferences and journals.

2003
Publication Details
  • Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Image Processing
  • Sep 14, 2003

Abstract

Close
This paper presents a video acquisition system that can learn automatic video capture from human's camera operations. Unlike a predefined camera control system, this system can easily adapt to its environment changes with users' help. By collecting users' camera-control operations under various environments, the control system can learn video capture from human, and use these learned skills to operate its cameras when remote viewers don't, won't, or can't operate the system. Moreover, this system allows remote viewers to control their own virtual cameras instead of watching the same video produced by a human operator or a fully automatic system. The online learning algorithm and the camera management algorithm are demonstrated using field data.
Publication Details
  • Bioinformatics
  • Sep 10, 2003

Abstract

Close
Motivation: EST data reflects variation in gene expression, but previous methods for finding coexpressed genes in EST data are subject to bias and vastly overstate the statistical significance of putatively coexpressed genes. Results: We introduce a new method (LNP) that reports reasonable $p$-values and also detects more biological relationships in human dbEST than do previous methods. In simulations with human dbEST library sizes, previous methods report $p$-values as low as $10^{-30}$ on 1/1,000 uncorrelated pairs, while LNP reports significance correctly. We validate the analysis on real human genes by comparing coexpressed pairs to GO annotations and find that LNP is more sensitive than three previous methods. We also find a small but statistically significant level of coexpression between interacting proteins relative to randomized controls. The LNP method is based on a log-normal prior on the distribution of expression levels. Availability: Source code in Java or R is available at http://ests.sourceforge.net/
Publication Details
  • SPIE Information Technologies and Communications
  • Sep 9, 2003

Abstract

Close
Hypervideo is a form of interactive video that allows users to follow links to other video. A simple form of hypervideo, called "detail-on-demand video," provides at most one link from one segment of video to another, supporting a singlebutton interaction. Detail-on-demand video is well suited for interactive video summaries, because the user can request a more detailed summary while watching the video. Users interact with the video is through a special hypervideo player that displays keyframes with labels indicating when a link is available. While detail-on-demand summaries can be manually authored, it is a time-consuming task. To address this issue, we developed an algorithm to automatically generate multi-level hypervideo summaries. The highest level of the summary consists of the most important clip from each take or scene in the video. At each subsequent level, more clips from each take or scene are added in order of their importance. We give one example in which a hypervideo summary is created for a linear training video. We also show how the algorithm can be modified to produce a hypervideo summary for home video.

Multimedia Fliers: Informal Information Sharing With Digital Community Bulletin Boards

Publication Details
  • Communities and Technologies, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2003
  • Sep 5, 2003

Abstract

Close
Community poster boards serve an important community building function. Posted fliers advertise services, events and people's interests, and invite community members to communicate, participate, interact and transact. In this paper we describe the design, development and deployment of the Plasma Poster Network, a network of large screen, digital community poster boards, the Plasma Posters. An initial deployment of Plasma Posters is within our own organization, a software research community made up of technologists and designers. We present our motivation and two fieldwork studies of online and offline information sharing before describing the Plasma Posters and the underlying information storage and distribution infrastructure. Finally, we summarize findings from qualitative and quantitative evaluations of Plasma Poster usage and conclude by elaborating on socio-technical challenges that have been faced in the design and deployment of the Plasma Poster Network.

The Plasma Poster Network: Posting Multimedia Content in Public Places

Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 599-606
  • Sep 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
Much effort has been expended in creating online information resources to foster social networks, create synergies between collocated and remote colleagues, and enhance social capital within organizations. Following the observation that physical bulletin boards serve an important community building and maintenance function, in this paper we describe a network of large screen, digital bulletin boards, the Plasma Poster Network. The function of this system is to bridge the gap between online community interactions and shared physical spaces. We describe our motivation, a fieldwork study of information sharing practices within our organization, and an internal deployment of Plasma Posters.

Weaving Between Online and Offline Community Participation

Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 729-732
  • Sep 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
Much effort has been expended in creating online spaces for people to meet, network, share and organize. However, there is relatively little work, in comparison, that has addressed creating awareness of online community activities for those gathered together physically. We describe our efforts to advertise the online community spaces of CHIplace and CSCWplace using large screen, interactive bulletin boards that show online community information mixed with content generated at the conference itself. Our intention was to raise awareness of the online virtual community within the offline, face-to-face event. We describe the two deployments, at CHI 2002 and at CSCW 2002, and provide utilization data regarding people's participation within the physical and virtual locales.
Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 33-40
  • Sep 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
To simplify the process of editing interactive video, we developed the concept of "detail-on-demand" video as a subset of general hypervideo where a single button press reveals additional information about the current video sequence. Detail-on-demand video keeps the authoring and viewing interfaces relatively simple while supporting a wide range of interactive video applications. Our editor, Hyper-Hitchcock, builds on prior work on automatic analysis to find the best quality video clips. It introduces video composites as an abstraction for grouping and manipulating sets of video clips. Navigational links can be created between any two video clips or composites. Such links offer a variety of return behaviors for when the linked video is completed that can be tailored to different materials. Initial impressions from a pilot study indicate that Hyper-Hitchcock is easy to learn although the behavior of links is not immediately intuitive for all users.
Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 196-203
  • Sep 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
With digital still cameras, users can easily collect thousands of photos. Our goal is to make organizing and browsing photos simple and quick, while retaining scalability to large collections. To that end, we created a photo management application concentrating on areas that improve the overall experience without neglecting the mundane components of such an application. Our application automatically divides photos into meaningful events such as birthdays or trips. Several user interaction mechanisms enhance the user experience when organizing photos. Our application combines a light table for showing thumbnails of the entire photo collection with a tree view that supports navigating, sorting, and filtering photos by categories such as dates, events, people, and locations. A calendar view visualizes photos over time and allows for the quick assignment of dates to scanned photos. We fine-tuned our application by using it with large personal photo collections provided by several users.
Publication Details
  • Proceedings of INTERACT '03, pp. 583-590.
  • Sep 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
In a meeting room environment with multiple public wall displays and personal notebook computers, it is possible to design a highly interactive experience for manipulating and annotating slides. For the public displays, we present the ModSlideShow system with a discrete modular model for linking the displays into groups, along with a gestural interface for manipulating the flow of slides within a display group. For the applications on personal devices, an augmented reality widget with panoramic video supports interaction among the various displays. This widget is integrated into our NoteLook 3.0 application for annotating, capturing and beaming slides on pen-based notebook computers.
Publication Details
  • Proceedings of Hypertext '03, pp. 124-125
  • Aug 26, 2003

Abstract

Close
Existing hypertext systems have emphasized either the navigational or spatial expression of relationships between objects. We are exploring the combination of these modes of expression in Hyper-Hitchcock, a hypervideo editor. Hyper-Hitchcock supports a form of hypervideo called "detail-on-demand video" due to its applicability to situations where viewers need to take a link to view more details on the content currently being presented. Authors of detail-on-demand video select, group, and spatially arrange video clips into linear sequences in a two-dimensional workspace. Hyper-Hitchcock uses a simple spatial parser to determine the temporal order of selected video clips. Authors add navigational links between the elements in those sequences. This combination of navigational and spatial hypertext modes of expression separates the clip sequence from the navigational structure of the hypervideo. Such a combination can be useful in cases where multiple forms of inter-object relationships must be expressed on the same content.

Identifying Useful Passages in Documents based on Annotation Patterns.

Publication Details
  • 7th European Conference on Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries (ECDL 2003) Trondheim, Norway, August 17-22, 2003
  • Aug 17, 2003

Abstract

Close
Many readers annotate passages that are important to their work. If we understand the relationship between the types of marks on a passage and the passage's ultimate utility in a task, then we can design e-book software to facilitate access to the most important annotated parts of the documents. To investigate this hypothesis and to guide software design, we have analyzed annotations collected during an earlier study of law students reading printed case law and writing Moot Court briefs. This study has allowed us to characterize the relationship between the students' annotations and the citations they use in their final written briefs. We think of annotations that relate directly to the written brief as high-value annotations; these annotations have particular, detectable characteristics. Based on this study we have designed a mark parser that analyzes freeform digital ink to identify such high-value annotations.

Discourse Structure and Sentential Information Structure An Initial Proposal

Publication Details
  • Journal of Logic, Language and Information, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands
  • Aug 15, 2003

Abstract

Close
In this article we argue that discourse structure constrains the set of possible constituents in a discourse that can provide the relevant context for structuring information in a target sentence, while information structure critically constrains discourse structure ambiguity. For the speaker, the discourse structure provides a set of possible contexts for continuation while information structure assignment is independent of discourse structure. For the hearer, the information structure of a sentence together with discourse structure instructs dynamic semantics how rhematic information should be used to update the meaning representation of the discourse (Polanyi and van den Berg, 1996).
Publication Details
  • IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, v. I, pp. 221-224
  • Jul 7, 2003

Abstract

Close
A novel method is presented for inaudibly hiding information in an audio signal by subtly applying time-scale modification to segments of the signal. The sequence, duration, and degree of the time-scale modifications are the parameters which encode information in the altered signal. By comparing the altered signal with a reference copy, compressed and expanded regions can be identified and the hidden data recovered. This approach is novel and has several advantages over other methods: it is theoretically noiseless, it introduces no spectral distortion, and it is robust to all known methods of reproduction, compression, and transmission.
Publication Details
  • IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, v. II, pp. 77-80
  • Jul 7, 2003

Abstract

Close
We created an improved layout algorithm for automatically generating visual video summaries reminiscent of comic book pages. The summaries are comprised of images from the video that are sized according to their importance. The algorithm performs a global optimization with respect to a layout cost function that encompasses features such as the number of resized images and the amount of whitespace in the presentation. The algorithm creates summaries that: always fit exactly into the requested area, are varied by containing few rows with images of the same size, and have little whitespace at the end of the last row. The layout algorithm is fast enough to allow the interactive resizing of the summaries and the subsequent generation of a new layout.
Publication Details
  • IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, v. II, pp. 753-756
  • Jul 7, 2003

Abstract

Close
We created an alternative approach to existing video summaries that gives viewers control over the summaries by selecting hyperlinks to other video with additional information. We structure such summaries as "detail-on-demand" video, a subset of general hypervideo in which at most one link to another video sequence is available at any given time. Our editor for such video, Hyper-Hitchcock, provides a workspace in which an author can select and arrange video clips, generate composites from clips and from other composites, and place links between composites. To simplify dealing with a large number of clips, Hyper-Hitchcock generates iconic representations for composites that can be used to manipulate the composite as a whole. In addition to providing an authoring environment, Hyper-Hitchcock can automatically generate multi-level hypervideo summaries for immediate use or as the starting point for author modification.
Publication Details
  • 2003 International Conference on Multimedia and Expo
  • Jul 6, 2003

Abstract

Close
This paper presents an information-driven audiovisual signal acquisition approach. This approach has several advantages: users are encouraged to assist in signal acquisition; available sensors are managed based on both signal characteristics and users' suggestions. The problem formulation is consistent with many well-known empirical approaches widely used in previous systems and may provide analytical explanations to these approaches. We demonstrate the use of this approach to pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) camera management with field data.
Publication Details
  • HCI International 2003
  • Jun 22, 2003

Abstract

Close
A basic objective of ubiquitous computing research is ubiquitous information: the ability to utilize any content or service, using devices that are always at hand, over networks that don't tie us down. Although much progress has been made, the ideal remains elusive. This paper reflects on the interrelations among three dimensions of ubiquitous information: content, devices, and networks. We use our understanding of these dimensions to motivate our own attempt to create a ubiquitous information system by combining unlimited World Wide Web content with mobile phones and mobile phone networks. We briefly describe a middleware proxy system we developed to increase the usefulness of very small devices as Internet terminals. We conclude with a post-mortem analysis highlighting lessons learned for others interested in information systems for very small devices.
Publication Details
  • HCI International 2003
  • Jun 22, 2003

Abstract

Close
Everywhere we go, we are surrounded by shared devices: TVs, stereos, and appliances in the home; copiers, fax machines, and projectors in the office; phones and vending machines in public. Because these devices don't know who we are, they provide the same user interface and functionality to everyone. This paper describes a system for personalizing workplace document devices- projectors, public displays, and multi-function copiers-that has been in use for over two years in our organization. We compare user interfaces that are embedded (i.e., integrated or co-located with the shared device) versus portable (i.e., accessible via portable devices such as mobile phones or PDAs). We summarize lessons learned for others designing interfaces for shared ubiquitous devices.
Publication Details
  • Business Process Management Journal, Volume 9, Number 3, 2003, pages 337-353
  • Jun 9, 2003

Abstract

Close
Purveyors of knowledge management software have a disconcerting tendency to promote the myth that all problems may be solved by more powerful tools for the exchange of information in the workplace. This fallacy is based on the faulty assumption that knowledge management is about the management of knowledge (as if knowledge were a commodity that could be managed), as opposed to the management of people whose work depends critically on what they know. The origins of knowledge management are far more firmly rooted in the psychological legacy of organizational communication than they are in the technological legacy of information management systems. However, even organizational communication is an inadequate foundation, since various schools of thought in social theory, particularly the structuration theory of Anthony Giddens, inform us that interaction (in the workplace or in any other social setting) is not strictly limited to communication. Knowledge management thus requires moving beyond simplistic models of information exchange to more challenging problems of leveraging social interaction to the advantage of the enterprise. This paper focuses on the claim of structuration theory that the dimension of communication should be supplemented with additional dimensions of power and sanction. This perspective is then examined in light of a case study of crisis management practices, and the case study provides a basis for addressing implications for technological support.

Agent Supported Cooperative Work.

Publication Details
  • Mass,USA: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2003
  • Jun 1, 2003

Abstract

Close
This is a volume, edited by Ye and Churchill. The chapters detail the design of agent-baed technologies in service of collaborative and cooperative work practices.

AttrActive Windows: Dynamic Windows for Digital Bulletin Boards

Publication Details
  • CHI 2003
  • Apr 7, 2003

Abstract

Close
In this paper we describe AttrActive Windows, a novel interface for presenting live, interactive, multimedia content on a network of public, digital, bulletin boards. Implementing a paper flyer metaphor, AttrActive Windows are paper-like in appearance and are attached to a virtual corkboard by virtual pushpins. Windows can therefore appear in different orientations, creating an attractive, informal look. Attractive Windows can also have autonomous behaviors that are consistent with the corkboard metaphor, like fluttering in the wind. We describe the AttrActive Windows prototype, and offer the results of an initial evaluative user study.
Publication Details
  • CHI 2003
  • Apr 7, 2003

Abstract

Close
Shared freeform input is a technique for facilitating note taking across devices during a meeting. Laptop users enter text with a keyboard, whereas PDA and Tablet PC users input freeform ink with their stylus. Users can quickly reuse text and freeform ink already entered by others. We show how a new technique, freeform pasting, allowed us to deal with a variety of design issues such as quick and informal ink sharing, screen real estate, privacy and mixing ink-based and textual material.
Publication Details
  • Proc. SPIE Storage and Retrieval for Multimedia Databases, Vol. 5021, pp. 167-75
  • Jan 20, 2003

Abstract

Close
We present a framework for analyzing the structure of digital media streams. Though our methods work for video,text,and audio,we concentrate on detecting the structure of digital music files. In the first step,spectral data is used to construct a similarity matrix calculated from inter-frame spectral similarity. The digital audio can be robustly segmented by correlating a ernel along the diagonal of the similarity matrix. Once segmented, spectral statistics of each segment are computed.In the second step,segments are clustered based on the self- similarity of their statistics. This reveals the structure of the digital music in a set of segment boundaries and labels.Finally,the music can be summarized by selecting clusters with repeated segments throughout the piece. The summaries can be customized for various applications based on the structure of the original music.

AttrActive Windows: Active Windows for Pervasive Computing Applications

Publication Details
  • ACM Intelligent User Interface (IUI) 2003, Miami Beach, FL, pp 326
  • Jan 12, 2003

Abstract

Close
We introduce the AttrActive Windows user interface, a novel approach for presenting interactive content on large screen, interactive, digital, bulletin boards. Moving away from the desktop metaphor, AttrActive Windows are dynamic, non-uniform windows that can appear in different orientations and have autonomous behaviours to attract passers-by and invite interactions.
2002
Publication Details
  • IEEE Multimedia Signal Processing Workshop
  • Dec 11, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present a novel approach to automatically ex-tracting summary excerpts from audio and video. Our approach is to maximize the average similarity between the excerpt and the source. We first calculate a similarity matrix by comparing each pair of time samples using a quantitative similarity measure. To determine the segment with highest average similarity, we maximize the summation of the self-similarity matrix over the support of the segment. To select multiple excerpts while avoiding redundancy, we compute the non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) of the similarity matrix into its essential structural components. We then build a summary comprised of excerpts from the main components, selecting the excerpts for maximum average similarity within each component. Variations integrating segmentation and other information are also discussed, and experimental results are presented.
Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2002
  • Dec 1, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present methods for automatic and semi-automatic creation of music videos, given an arbitrary audio soundtrack and source video. Significant audio changes are automatically detected; similarly, the source video is automatically segmented and analyzed for suitability based on camera motion and exposure. Video with excessive camera motion or poor contrast is penalized with a high unsuitability score, and is more likely to be discarded in the final edit. High quality video clips are then automatically selected and aligned in time with significant audio changes. Video clips are adjusted to match the audio segments by selecting the most suitable region of the desired length. Besides a fully automated solution, our system can also start with clips manually selected and ordered using a graphical interface. The video is then created by truncating the selected clips (preserving the high quality portions) to produce a video digest that is synchronized with the soundtrack music, thus enhancing the impact of both.
Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia 2002
  • Dec 1, 2002

Abstract

Close
FlySPEC is a video camera system designed for real-time remote operation. A hybrid design combines the high resolution possible using an optomechanical video camera, with the wide field of view always available from a panoramic camera. The control system integrates requests from multiple users with the result that each controls a virtual camera. The control system seamlessly integrates manual and fully automatic control. It supports a range of options from untended automatic to full manual control, and the system can learn control strategies from user requests. Additionally, the panoramic view is always available for an intuitive interface, and objects are never out of view regardless of the zoom factor. We present the system architecture, an information-theoretic approach to combining panoramic and zoomed images to optimally satisfy user requests, and experimental results that show the FlySPEC system significantly assists users in a remote inspection tasks.
Publication Details
  • ACM 2002 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work
  • Nov 16, 2002

Abstract

Close
Technology can play an important role in enabling people to interact with each other. The Web is one such technology with the affordances for sharing information and for connecting people to people. In this paper, we describe the design of two social interaction Web sites for two different social groups. We review several related efforts to provide principles for creating social interaction environments and describe the specific principles that guided our design. To examine the effectiveness of the two sites, we analyze the usage data. Finally, we discuss approaches for encouraging participation and lessons learned.

Moving Markup: Repositioning Freeform Annotations

Publication Details
  • Proceedings of ACM UIST 2002
  • Oct 27, 2002

Abstract

Close
Freeform digital ink annotation allows readers to interact with documents in an intuitive and familiar manner. Such marks are easy to manage on static documents, and provide a familiar annotation experience. In this paper, we describe an implementation of a freeform annotation system that accommodates dynamic document layout. The algorithm preserves the correct position of annotations when documents are viewed with different fonts or font sizes, with different aspect ratios, or on different devices. We explore a range of heuristics and algorithms required to handle common types of annotation, and conclude with a discussion of possible extensions to handle special kinds of annotations and changes to documents.
Publication Details
  • IEEE InfoVis '02 Interactive Poster and Demo
  • Oct 27, 2002

Abstract

Close
This work presents constructs called interactive space-time maps along with an application called the SpaceTime Browser for visualizing and retrieving documents. A 3D visualization with 2D planar maps and a time line is employed. Users can select regions on the maps and choose precise time intervals by sliding the maps along the telescopic time line. Regions are highlighted to indicate the presence of documents with matching space-time attributes, and documents are retrieved and displayed in an adjoining workspace. We provide two examples: (1) organizing travel photos, (2) managing documents created by room location-aware devices in a building.

Context-Aware Communication

Publication Details
  • IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine, Vol. 9, No. 5.
  • Oct 15, 2002

Abstract

Close
This paper describes how the changing information about an individual's location, environment, and social situation can be used to initiate and facilitate people's interactions with one another, individually and in groups. Context-aware communication is contrasted with other forms of context-aware computing and we characterize applications in terms of design decisions along two dimensions: the extent of autonomy in context sensing and the extent of autonomy in communication action. A number of context-aware communication applications from the research literature are presented in five application categories. Finally, a number of issues related to the design of context-aware communication applications are presented.

Web Interaction Using Very Small Internet Devices

Publication Details
  • IEEE Computer Magazine, Cover Feature, Vol. 35, No. 10.
  • Oct 15, 2002

Abstract

Close
Squeezing desktop Web content into smart phones and text pagers is more practical with separate interfaces for navigation and content manipulation. m-Links, a middleware proxy system, supports this dual-mode browsing, offering phonetop users an extendable set of actions.
Publication Details
  • 2002 International Symposium on Music Information Retrieval
  • Oct 13, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present methods for automatically producing summary excerpts or thumbnails of music. To find the most representative excerpt, we maximize the average segment similarity to the entire work. After window-based audio parameterization, a quantitative similarity measure is calculated between every pair of windows, and the results are embedded in a 2-D similarity matrix. Summing the similarity matrix over the support of a segment results in a measure of how similar that segment is to the whole. This measure is maximized to find the segment that best represents the entire work. We discuss variations on the method, and present experimental results for orchestral music, popular songs, and jazz. These results demonstrate that the method finds significantly representative excerpts, using very few assumptions about the source audio.

Audio Retrieval by Rhythmic Similarity

Publication Details
  • 2002 International Symposium on Music Information Retrieval
  • Oct 13, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present a method for characterizing both the rhythm and tempo of music. We also present ways to quantitatively measure the rhythmic similarity between two or more works of music. This allows rhythmically similar works to be retrieved from a large collection. A related application is to sequence music by rhythmic similarity, thus providing an automatic "disc jockey" function for musical libraries. Besides specific analysis and retrieval methods, we present small-scale experiments that demonstrate ranking and retrieving musical audio by rhythmic similarity.
Publication Details
  • The 4th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2002).
  • Sep 29, 2002

Abstract

Close
As ubiquitous computing becomes widespread, we are increasingly coming into contact with "shared" computer-enhanced devices, such as cars, televisions, and photocopiers. Our interest is in identifying general issues in personalizing such shared everyday devices. Our approach is to compare alternative personalization methods by deploying and using alternative personalization interfaces (portable and embedded) for three shared devices in our workplace (a presentation PC, a plasma display for brainstorming, and a multi-function copier). This paper presents the comparative prototyping methodology we employed, the experimental system we deployed, observations and feedback from use, and resulting issues in designing personalized shared ubiquitous devices.
Publication Details
  • Workshop on User centered Evaluations for Ubiquitous Computing Systems: Best Known Methods, The 4th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2002).
  • Sep 29, 2002

Abstract

Close
Evaluating ubiquitous systems is hard, and has attracted the attention of others in the research community. These investigators, like others in CSCW, argue there is a basic mismatch between traditional evaluation techniques and the needs posed by ubiquitous systems. Namely, these systems are embedded in a variety of complex real world environments that cannot be easily modeled (as required by theoretical analyses), simulated, measured, or controlled (as required by laboratory experiments). As a result, many investigators have abandoned traditional comparative evaluation techniques and opted instead for techniques adapted from the social sciences, such as anthropology. We wanted to perform a comparative evaluation similar to a laboratory experiment, but in such a way that we could observe the effects of our design decisions in relatively unconstrained, real world use. This led us to the process described in this paper.

Low-Resolution Supplementary Tactile Cues for Navigational Assistance

Publication Details
  • In proceedings of Mobile HCI 2002. (Pisa, Italy,2002), Springer-Verlag, Lecture notes in computer science #2411,pp.369-372.
  • Sep 18, 2002

Abstract

Close
The TactGuide is a mobile navigation device 'displaying' personalized direction cues by means of a tactile and 'tactful' representation. The TactGuide is operated by tactile inspection which is subtle enough to allow the users to engage/disengage in device interaction while preserving their visual, auditory and kinesthetic senses for inspection of the environment. The TactGuide design thereby accommodates the users' need to economize their attentional resources between device and environment while navigating through physical space. Preliminary experiments indicates that users readily map the tactile cues to spatial directions and that TactGuide can be operated as a supplement to, and without compromising, the use of our existing wayfinding abilities. substituting the use of our natural abilities and earned skills for wayfinding.
Publication Details
  • Journal of Mathematical Physics, September 2002 special issue on Quantum Information Theory, Vol. 43 (9), pp. 4376 - 7381.
  • Sep 7, 2002

Abstract

Close

To implement any quantum operation (a.k.a. ``superoperator'' or ``CP map'') on a d-dimensional quantum system, it is enough to apply a suitable overall unitary transformation to the system and a d^2-dimensional environment which is initialized in a fixed pure state. It has been suggested that a d-dimensional environment might be enough if we could initialize the environment in a mixed state of our choosing. In this note we show with elementary means that certain explicit quantum operations cannot be realized in this way. Our counterexamples map some pure states to pure states, giving strong and easily manageable conditions on the overall unitary transformation. Everything works in the more general setting of quantum operations from d-dimensional to d'-dimensional spaces, so we place our counterexamples within this more general framework.

Publication Details
  • Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, Lausanne, Switzerland, August 2002
  • Aug 26, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present a method for rapidly and robustly extracting audio excerpts without the overhead of speech recognition or speaker segmentation. An immediate application is to automatically augment keyframe-based video summaries with informative audio excerpts associated with the video segments represented by the keyframes. Short audio clips combined with keyframes comprise an extremely lightweight and Web-browsable interface for auditioning video or similar media, without using bandwidth-intensive streaming video or audio.
Publication Details
  • IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo 2002
  • Aug 26, 2002

Abstract

Close
This paper presents a camera system called FlySPEC. In contrast to a traditional camera system that provides the same video stream to every user, FlySPEC can simultaneously serve different video-viewing requests. This flexibility allows users to conveniently participate in a seminar or meeting at their own pace. Meanwhile, the FlySPEC system provides a seamless blend of manual control and automation. With this control mix, users can easily make tradeoffs between video capture effort and video quality. The FlySPEC camera is constructed by installing a set of Pan/Tilt/Zoom (PTZ) cameras near a high-resolution panoramic camera. While the panoramic camera provides the basic functionality of serving different viewing requests, the PTZ camera is managed by our algorithm to improve the overall video quality that may affect users watching details. The video resolution improvements from using different camera management strategies are compared in the experimental section.

Detecting Path Intersections in Panoramic Video

Publication Details
  • IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo 2002
  • Aug 26, 2002

Abstract

Close
Given panoramic video taken along a self-intersecting path, we present a method for detecting the intersection points. This allows "virtual tours" to be synthesized by splicing the panoramic video at the intersection points. Spatial intersections are detected by finding the best-matching panoramic images from a number of nearby candidates. Each panoramic image is segmented into horizontal strips. Each strip is averaged in the vertical direction. The Fourier coefficients of the resulting 1-D data capture the rotation-invariant horizontal texture of each panoramic image. The distance between two panoramic images is calculated as the sum of the distances between their strip texture pairs at the same row positions. The intersection is chosen as the two candidate panoramic images that have the minimum distance.
Publication Details
  • SPIE ITCOM 2002
  • Jul 31, 2002

Abstract

Close
We present a framework, motivated by rate-distortion theory and the human visual system, for optimally representing the real world given limited video resolution. To provide users with high fidelity views, we built a hybrid video camera system that combines a fixed wide-field panoramic camera with a controllable pan/tilt/zoom (PTZ) camera. In our framework, a video frame is viewed as a limited-frequency representation of some "true" image function. Our system combines outputs from both cameras to construct the highest fidelity views possible, and controls the PTZ camera to maximize information gain available from higher spatial frequencies. In operation, each remote viewer is presented with a small panoramic view of the entire scene, and a larger close-up view of a selected region. Users may select a region by marking the panoramic view. The system operates the PTZ camera to best satisfy requests from multiple users. When no regions are selected, the system automatically operates the PTZ camera to minimize predicted video distortion. High-resolution images are cached and sent if a previously recorded region has not changed and the PTZ camera is pointed elsewhere. We present experiments demonstrating that the panoramic image can effectively predict where to gain the most information, and also that the system provides better images to multiple users than conventional camera systems.

Communication and Understanding for Decision Support

Publication Details
  • Proceedings of the IFIP International Conference on Decision Making and Decision Support in the Internet Age
  • Jul 4, 2002

Abstract

Close
As the technology for communication changes, the role of communication in the conduct of business changes with it. Communication is no longer just a technical matter of separating signal from noise and managing bandwidth but also a social matter in which negotiating differences in understanding among and between communicators is a primary business priority. Addressing this priority requires an understanding of how individuals interact in the course of their decision making activities. Using the work of Anthony Giddens as a point of departure, this paper views interaction in communication as consisting of three dimensions - meaning, authority, and trust. These three dimensions are used to identify new opportunities for advances in decision making technology which help deal with potential breakdowns in social interaction.