Publications

From 2017 (Clear Search)

2017
Publication Details
  • IEEE PerCom 2017
  • Mar 13, 2017

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We present Lift, a visible light-enabled finger tracking and object localization technique that allows users to perform freestyle multi-touch gestures on any object’s surface in an everyday environment. By projecting encoded visible patterns onto an object’s surface (e.g. paper, display, or table), and localizing the user’s fingers with light sensors, Lift offers users a richer interactive space than the device’s existing interfaces. Additionally, everyday objects can be augmented by attaching sensor units onto their surface to accept multi-touch gesture input. We also present two applications as a proof of concept. Finally, results from our experiments indicate that Lift can localize ten fingers simultaneously with accuracy of 0.9 mm and 1.8 mm on two axes respectively and an average refresh rate of 84 Hz with 16.7ms delay on WiFi and 12ms delay on serial, making gesture recognition on noninstrumented objects possible.
Publication Details
  • TRECVID Workshop
  • Mar 1, 2017

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This is a summary of our participation in the TRECVID 2016 video hyperlinking task (LNK). We submitted four runs in total. A baseline system combined on established vectorspace text indexing and cosine similarity. Our other runs explored the use of distributed word representations in combination with fine-grained inter-segment text similarity measures.
Publication Details
  • To appear in CHI 2017 (4/22/2017)
  • Jan 22, 2017

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Work breaks can play an important role in the mental and physical well-being of workers and contribute positively to productivity. In this paper we explore the use of activity-, physiological-, and indoor-location sensing to promote mobility during work-breaks. While the popularity of devices and applications to promote physical activity is growing, prior research highlights important constraints when designing for the workplace. With these constraints in mind, we developed BreakSense, a mobile application that uses a Bluetooth beacon infrastructure, a smartphone and a smartwatch to encourage mobility during breaks with a game-like design. We discuss constraints imposed by design for work and the workplace, and highlight challenges associated with the use of noisy sensors and methods to overcome them. We then describe a short deployment of BreakSense within our lab that examined bound vs. unbound augmented breaks and how they affect users’ sense of completion and readiness to work.