Magic Mirror

Dynamic 3D virtual models of physical spaces

Our Magic Mirror work creates dynamic 3D virtual models of physical spaces that reflect the structure and activities of those spaces to help support navigation, context awareness and tasks such as planning and recollection of events.

A rich sensor network dynamically updates the models, determining the position of people, status of rooms, or updating textures to reflect displays or bulletin boards. Through views on web pages, portable devices, or on ‘magic window’ displays located in the physical space, remote people may ‘look in’ to the space, while people within the space are provided with augmented views showing information not physically apparent.

For example, by looking at a Magic Mirror display, people can learn how long others have been present, or where they have been. People in one part of a building can get a sense of activities in the rest of the building, know who is present in their office, and look in to presentations in other rooms. A spatial graph is derived from the 3D models which is used both to navigational paths and for fusion of acoustic, WiFi, motion and image sensors used for positioning. Magic Mirrors have been deployed in two research lab and a conference venue.

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Related Publications

2012
Publication Details
  • IPIN2012
  • Nov 13, 2012

Abstract

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We describe Explorer, a system utilizing mirror worlds - dynamic 3D virtual models of physical spaces that reflect the structure and activities of those spaces to help support navigation, context awareness and tasks such as planning and recollection of events. A rich sensor network dynamically updates the models, determining the position of people, status of rooms, or updating textures to reflect displays or bulletin boards. Through views on web pages, portable devices, or on 'magic window' displays located in the physical space, remote people may 'Clook in' to the space, while people within the space are provided with augmented views showing information not physically apparent. For example, by looking at a mirror display, people can learn how long others have been present, or where they have been. People in one part of a building can get a sense of activities in the rest of the building, know who is present in their office, and look in to presentations in other rooms. A spatial graph is derived from the 3D models which is used both to navigational paths and for fusion of acoustic, WiFi, motion and image sensors used for positioning. We describe usage scenarios for the system as deployed in two research labs, and a conference venue.
2011

Augmented Perception through Mirror Worlds

Publication Details
  • Augmented Human 2011
  • Mar 12, 2011

Abstract

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We describe a system that mirrors a public physical space into cyberspace to provide people with augmented awareness of that space. Through views on web pages, portable devices, or on `Magic Window' displays located in the physical space, remote people may `look in' to the space, while people within the space are provided information not apparent through unaided perception. For example, by looking at a mirror display, people can learn how long others have been present, where they have been, etc. People in one part of a building can get a sense of the activities in the rest of the building, who is present in their office, look in to a talk in another room, etc. We describe a prototype for such a system developed in our research lab and office space.
2010

Camera Pose Navigation using Augmented Reality

Publication Details
  • ISMAR 2010
  • Oct 13, 2010

Abstract

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We propose an Augmented Reality (AR) system that helps users take a picture from a designated pose, such as the position and camera angle of an earlier photo. Repeat photography is frequently used to observe and document changes in an object. Our system uses AR technology to estimate camera poses in real time. When a user takes a photo, the camera pose is saved as a 'view bookmark.' To support a user in taking a repeat photo, two simple graphics are rendered in an AR viewer on the camera's screen to guide the user to this bookmarked view. The system then uses image adjustment techniques to create an image based on the user's repeat photo that is even closer to the original.

Geometric reconstruction from point-normal data

Publication Details
  • SIAM MI'09 monograph. Related talks: SIAM GPM'09, SIAM MI'09, and BAMA (Bay Area Mathematical Adventures)
  • May 1, 2010

Abstract

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Creating virtual models of real spaces and objects is cumber- some and time consuming. This paper focuses on the prob- lem of geometric reconstruction from sparse data obtained from certain image-based modeling approaches. A number of elegant and simple-to-state problems arise concerning when the geometry can be reconstructed. We describe results and counterexamples, and list open problems.
2009

Marking up a World: Physical Markup for Virtual Content Creation (Video)

Publication Details
  • ACM Multimedia
  • Oct 21, 2009

Abstract

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The Pantheia system enables users to create virtual models by `marking up' the real world with pre-printed markers. The markers have prede fined meanings that guide the system as it creates models. Pantheia takes as input user captured images or video of the marked up space. This video illustrates the workings of the system and shows it being used to create three models, one of a cabinet, one of a lab, and one of a conference room. As part of the Pantheia system, we also developed a 3D viewer that spatially integrates a model with images of the model.

Interactive Models from Images of a Static Scene

Publication Details
  • Computer Graphics and Virtual Reality (CGVR '09)
  • Jul 13, 2009

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FXPAL's Pantheia system enables users to create virtual models by 'marking up' a physical space with pre-printed visual markers. The meanings associated with the markers come from a markup language that enables the system to create models from a relatively sparse set of markers. This paper describes extensions to our markup language and system that support the creation of interactive virtual objects. Users place markers to define components such as doors and drawers with which an end user of the model can interact. Other interactive elements, such as controls for color changes or lighting choices, are also supported. Pantheia produced a model of a room with hinged doors, a cabinet with drawers, doors, and color options, and a railroad track.
Publication Details
  • Immerscom 2009
  • May 27, 2009

Abstract

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We describe Pantheia, a system that constructs virtual models of real spaces from collections of images, through the use of visual markers that guide and constrain model construction. To create a model users simply `mark up' the real world scene by placing pre-printed markers that describe scene elements or impose semantic constraints. Users then collect still images or video of the scene. From this input, Pantheia automatically and quickly produces a model. The Pantheia system was used to produce models of two rooms that demonstrate the e ectiveness of the approach.