Personal Interaction Points

Personalized interfaces for shared devices

The Personal Interaction Points system leverages users’ networked resources—or “personal information clouds”—to create personalized user interfaces for shared  devices, such as projectors, public displays, and multi-function copiers.

Everywhere we go, we are surrounded by shared devices: TVs, stereos, and appliances in the home; copiers, fax machines, and projectors in the office; phones and vending machines in public. Because these devices don’t know who we are, they provide the same user interface and functionality to everyone.

This lack of personalization in the real world is reminiscent of the World Wide Web in its infancy: no matter who you were, you saw the same Web pages as everyone else. But like the web, we are now beginning to see everyday devices that personalize themselves to their users. The BMW 7 Series, for example, remembers drivers’ seat, mirror, and steering wheel settings and recalls them automatically when family members use their unique keys to enter the car.

The Personal Interaction Points system combines users’ networked resources—or “personal information clouds”—with device-specific user interfaces for performing common tasks on shared document devices such as projectors, public displays, and multi-function copiers. We developed and compared personal interfaces that are embedded (i.e., integrated or co-located with the shared device) versus portable (i.e., accessible via portable devices such as mobile phones or PDAs).

In short, we found that a little personalization can go a long way toward improving the user friendliness, efficiency, and capabilities of shared document devices.

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Related Publications

2007
Publication Details
  • IEEE Pervasive Computing Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 3, Jul-Sep 2007.
  • Jul 1, 2007

Abstract

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AnySpot is a web service-based platform for seamlessly connecting people to their personal and shared documents wherever they go. We describe the principles behind AnySpot's design and report our experience deploying it in a large, multi-national organization.
2004
Publication Details
  • ACM Interactions Magazine
  • May 1, 2004

Abstract

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This article describes two years of experience with a research prototype for personalizing shared workplace devices such as projectors, public displays, and multi-function copiers. The system combines users' networked resources-or "personal information clouds"—with device-specific user interfaces for performing common device tasks. We developed and compared personal interfaces that are embedded (i.e., integrated or co-located with the shared device) and portable (i.e., accessible via personal devices such as mobile phones and PDAs). Our experience indicates that a little personalization can go a long way toward improving user friendliness, efficiency, and capabilities of shared document devices, helping them "weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life". We also gained important insights into subtle differences between embedded and portable approaches to ubiquitous computing systems.
2003
Publication Details
  • HCI International 2003
  • Jun 22, 2003

Abstract

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Everywhere we go, we are surrounded by shared devices: TVs, stereos, and appliances in the home; copiers, fax machines, and projectors in the office; phones and vending machines in public. Because these devices don't know who we are, they provide the same user interface and functionality to everyone. This paper describes a system for personalizing workplace document devices- projectors, public displays, and multi-function copiers-that has been in use for over two years in our organization. We compare user interfaces that are embedded (i.e., integrated or co-located with the shared device) versus portable (i.e., accessible via portable devices such as mobile phones or PDAs). We summarize lessons learned for others designing interfaces for shared ubiquitous devices.
2002
Publication Details
  • The 4th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2002).
  • Sep 29, 2002

Abstract

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As ubiquitous computing becomes widespread, we are increasingly coming into contact with "shared" computer-enhanced devices, such as cars, televisions, and photocopiers. Our interest is in identifying general issues in personalizing such shared everyday devices. Our approach is to compare alternative personalization methods by deploying and using alternative personalization interfaces (portable and embedded) for three shared devices in our workplace (a presentation PC, a plasma display for brainstorming, and a multi-function copier). This paper presents the comparative prototyping methodology we employed, the experimental system we deployed, observations and feedback from use, and resulting issues in designing personalized shared ubiquitous devices.
Publication Details
  • Workshop on User centered Evaluations for Ubiquitous Computing Systems: Best Known Methods, The 4th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2002).
  • Sep 29, 2002

Abstract

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Evaluating ubiquitous systems is hard, and has attracted the attention of others in the research community. These investigators, like others in CSCW, argue there is a basic mismatch between traditional evaluation techniques and the needs posed by ubiquitous systems. Namely, these systems are embedded in a variety of complex real world environments that cannot be easily modeled (as required by theoretical analyses), simulated, measured, or controlled (as required by laboratory experiments). As a result, many investigators have abandoned traditional comparative evaluation techniques and opted instead for techniques adapted from the social sciences, such as anthropology. We wanted to perform a comparative evaluation similar to a laboratory experiment, but in such a way that we could observe the effects of our design decisions in relatively unconstrained, real world use. This led us to the process described in this paper.