Plasma Poster

A network of large screen, digital community poster boards

In the Plasma Poster project we developed a network of large screen, digital community poster boards.

Community poster boards serve an important community building function. Posted fliers advertise services, events and people’s interests, and invite community members to communicate, participate, interact and transact. In this project, we explore the design, development and deployment of the Plasma Poster Network, a network of large screen, digital community poster boards, the Plasma Posters. An initial deployment of Plasma Posters is within our own organization, a software research community made up of technologists and designers.

Plasma Poster has also been incorporated into our Corporate Memory system.

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Related Publications

2004

Who cares? Reflecting who is reading what on distributed community bulletin boards

Publication Details
  • UIST 2004, the Seventeenth Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology, October 24-27, 2004
  • Oct 24, 2004

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In this paper, we describe the YeTi information sharing system that has been designed to foster community building through informal digital content sharing. The YeTi system is a general information parsing, hosting and distribution infrastructure, with interfaces designed for individual and public content reading. In this paper we describe the YeTi public display interface, with a particular focus on tools we have designed to provide lightweight awareness of others' interactions with and interest in posted content. Our tools augment content with metadata that reflect people's reading of content - captured video clips of who's reading and interacting with content, tools to allow people to leave explicit freehand annotations about content, and a visualization of the content access history to show when content is interacted with. Results from an initial evaluation are presented and discussed.

Sharing Multimedia Content with Interactive Displays: A Case Study

Publication Details
  • ACM DIS 2004, Cambridge, August 1-4, 2004. New York: ACM
  • Apr 18, 2004

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The Plasma Posters are large screen, digital, interactive posterboards designed for informal content sharing within teams, groups, organizations and communities. Leveraging the fact that the physical world is often used as a canvas for asynchronous information exchange via paper fliers and posters, the Plasma Posters provide a platform for sharing interactive digital content in public places. People serendipitously encounter multimedia content usually only encountered from the desktop, while going about their daily business. In this paper we describe the Plasma Poster interface in detail, and offer and overview of the underlying information authoring, parsing, storage, distribution and publishing infrastructure, the Plasma Poster Network. We report qualitative and quantitative data collected over 14 months of use that demonstrate the Plasma Posters have become an integral part of information sharing within our organization. We conclude the paper by reflecting on the patterns of adoption, and speculate on factors that have contributed to the system's success. Finally we briefly describe three other installations of the Plasma Poster Network and new interfaces that have been designed.

Digital Graffiti: Public Annotation of Multimedia Content

Publication Details
  • CHI 2004, Vienna, Austria, April 24-29, 2004. New York: ACM Publications.
  • Feb 26, 2004

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Our physical environment is increasingly filled with multimedia content on situated, community public displays. We are designing methods for people to post and acquire digital information to and from public digital displays, and to modify and annotate previously posted content to create publicly observable threads. We support in-the-moment and on-site "person-to-place-to-people-to-persons" content interaction, annotation, augmentation and publication. We draw design inspiration from field work observations of how people remove, modify and mark up paper postings. We present our initial designs in this arena, and some initial user reactions.

Gooey Interfaces: An Approach for Rapidly Repurposing Digital Content

Publication Details
  • CHI 2004, Vienna, Austria, April 24-29, 2004. New York: ACM Publications
  • Feb 20, 2004

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With the acceleration of technological development we are reaching the point where our systems and their user interfaces become to some degree outdated 'legacy systems' as soon as they are released. This raises the question of how can we maintain, extend, override, and adapt these systems while preserving what people depend on in them? In this paper we describe an approach for dynamically restructuring user interfaces into a set of communicating processes that 1) provide methods for changing their appearance, behavior, and state; and 2) report their proposed state changes so that other processes may override their actions in updating themselves to a new state. We do this for both new and wrapped legacy user interface components, thereby allowing us to repurpose user interfaces for our evolving needs. We describe how this approach has been successfully used in rapidly creating and deploying interfaces that repurpose content for new appearances and behaviors.
2003

Public and Situated Displays. Social and Interactional Aspects of Shared Display Technologies

Publication Details
  • Lond: Kluwer Academic Publishers
  • Dec 31, 2003

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Public and situated display technologies have an important impact on individual and social behaviour and present us with particular interesting new design considerations and challenges. While there is a growing body of research exploring these design considerations and social impacts this work remains somewhat disparate, making it difficult to assimilate in a coherent manner. This book brings together the perspective of key researchers in the area of public and situated display technology. The chapters detail research representing the social, technical and interactional aspects of public and sitauted display technologies. The underlying concern common to these chapters is how these displays can be best designed for collaboration, coordination, community building and mobility.

THE PLASMA POSTER NETWORK Social Hypermedia on Public Display

Publication Details
  • In Public and Situated Displays. Social and Interactional Aspects of Shared Display Technologies. K. O'Hara, M.Perry, E. Churchill and D. Russell (Eds) London: Kluwer Acamdemic Publishers
  • Dec 31, 2003

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The sharing of digital materials within online communities has increased significantly in recent years. Our work focuses on promoting community information sharing in public spaces using large screen, interactive, digital poster boards called the Plasma Posters. In this chapter we first describe our fieldwork-led, iterative design process, and elaborate a number of design guidelines that resulted. Following this, the design and development of the Plasma Posters themselves and the underlying network infrastructure is discussed. Finally, we present results from qualitative and quantitative evaluations over the course of a ten-month deployment of three Plasma Posters within our own organization, a software research community made up of technologists and designers. We conclude with observations regarding ergonomic, social and other factors that were raised during the design and deployment and offer reflections on factors in the success of this deployment.

A fast, interactive 3D paper-flier metaphor for digital bulletin boards

Publication Details
  • UIST 2003
  • Nov 1, 2003

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We describe a novel interface for presenting interactive content on public digital bulletin boards. Inspired by paper fliers on physical bulletin boards, posted content is displayed using 3D virtual fliers attached to a virtual corkboard by virtual pushpins. Fliers appear in different orientations, creating an attractive, informal look, and have autonomous behaviors like fluttering in the wind. Passers-by can rotate, move and fold fliers; they can also interact with fliers' live content. Flier content is streamed from a server and represented by the system on large screen displays using a real-time cloth simulation algorithm. We describe our prototype, and offer the results of an initial evaluative user study.

Palimpsests on Public View:Annotating Community Content with Personal Devices

Publication Details
  • UBICOMP, Seattle, October 12-15th
  • Oct 12, 2003

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This demonstration introduces UbiComp attendees to a system for content annotation and open-air, social blogging on interactive, publicly situated, digital poster boards using public and personal devices. We describe our motivation, a scenario of use, our prototype, and an outline of the demonstration.

Multimedia Fliers: Informal Information Sharing With Digital Community Bulletin Boards

Publication Details
  • Communities and Technologies, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 2003
  • Sep 5, 2003

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Community poster boards serve an important community building function. Posted fliers advertise services, events and people's interests, and invite community members to communicate, participate, interact and transact. In this paper we describe the design, development and deployment of the Plasma Poster Network, a network of large screen, digital community poster boards, the Plasma Posters. An initial deployment of Plasma Posters is within our own organization, a software research community made up of technologists and designers. We present our motivation and two fieldwork studies of online and offline information sharing before describing the Plasma Posters and the underlying information storage and distribution infrastructure. Finally, we summarize findings from qualitative and quantitative evaluations of Plasma Poster usage and conclude by elaborating on socio-technical challenges that have been faced in the design and deployment of the Plasma Poster Network.

The Plasma Poster Network: Posting Multimedia Content in Public Places

Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 599-606
  • Sep 1, 2003

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Much effort has been expended in creating online information resources to foster social networks, create synergies between collocated and remote colleagues, and enhance social capital within organizations. Following the observation that physical bulletin boards serve an important community building and maintenance function, in this paper we describe a network of large screen, digital bulletin boards, the Plasma Poster Network. The function of this system is to bridge the gap between online community interactions and shared physical spaces. We describe our motivation, a fieldwork study of information sharing practices within our organization, and an internal deployment of Plasma Posters.

Weaving Between Online and Offline Community Participation

Publication Details
  • Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT '03, IOS Press, pp. 729-732
  • Sep 1, 2003

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Much effort has been expended in creating online spaces for people to meet, network, share and organize. However, there is relatively little work, in comparison, that has addressed creating awareness of online community activities for those gathered together physically. We describe our efforts to advertise the online community spaces of CHIplace and CSCWplace using large screen, interactive bulletin boards that show online community information mixed with content generated at the conference itself. Our intention was to raise awareness of the online virtual community within the offline, face-to-face event. We describe the two deployments, at CHI 2002 and at CSCW 2002, and provide utilization data regarding people's participation within the physical and virtual locales.

AttrActive Windows: Dynamic Windows for Digital Bulletin Boards

Publication Details
  • CHI 2003
  • Apr 7, 2003

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In this paper we describe AttrActive Windows, a novel interface for presenting live, interactive, multimedia content on a network of public, digital, bulletin boards. Implementing a paper flyer metaphor, AttrActive Windows are paper-like in appearance and are attached to a virtual corkboard by virtual pushpins. Windows can therefore appear in different orientations, creating an attractive, informal look. Attractive Windows can also have autonomous behaviors that are consistent with the corkboard metaphor, like fluttering in the wind. We describe the AttrActive Windows prototype, and offer the results of an initial evaluative user study.

AttrActive Windows: Active Windows for Pervasive Computing Applications

Publication Details
  • ACM Intelligent User Interface (IUI) 2003, Miami Beach, FL, pp 326
  • Jan 12, 2003

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We introduce the AttrActive Windows user interface, a novel approach for presenting interactive content on large screen, interactive, digital, bulletin boards. Moving away from the desktop metaphor, AttrActive Windows are dynamic, non-uniform windows that can appear in different orientations and have autonomous behaviours to attract passers-by and invite interactions.